Category: Featured Produce

Hakurei turnips

Hakurei Salad Turnips

Hakurei turnips are a Japanese salad turnip.  They are sweet and much softer than a regular turnip, and rarely need to be peeled; just wash and trim the root ends.  The leaves are also edible but should be eaten within 1-2 days.  Wrapped tightly in plastic, the turnips can be stored in the refrigerator for up to 1 week. (more…)

English Peas

Garden Peas (aka English Peas)

Garden, or English peas, are your standard “pea in a pod.” They have more nutrients and calories than snow or sugar snap peas and are a bit more work as they need to be shelled. Garden peas are sweet and succulent for three to four days after they are picked, but turn mushy and starchy very quickly after harvesting.  So use them fast! (more…)

Sugar snap peas

Sugar Snap Peas

Sugar snap peas, unlike last week’s garden peas, have edible pods that are filled with plump sweet peas.  Use them quickly as they lose their flavor and structure when stored.  They can be eaten raw, but are best when cooked, requiring little time:  steam sugar snaps for about 4 minutes.

Sugar snap peas are a member of the legume family and are a good source of folate, vitamins A and C, and zinc.

Lettuce

Lettuce

It is true, eating all that salad is good for you!  While the nutritional value of lettuce varies with the variety, the following excerpt from the University of Illinois website sets the record straight:  Lettuce in general provides small amounts of dietary fiber, some carbohydrates, a little protein and a trace of fat. Its most important nutrients are vitamin A and potassium.   (more…)

Bok Choy

Bok Choy

Bok Choy is technically a Chinese cabbage. But until you cook with bok choy, you cannot appreciate how special it is. It has a mellow taste compared to some of the other asian greens such as tatsoi. (more…)

Daikon Radish

Daikon Radish

Daikon, or white radish, is traditional to Asian cooking. It is a long white radish, and given its shape and color, has been called an “icicle radish”. It is extremely versatile in cooking. You can use it anywhere you would normally use a regular radish, and in some ways that are unique. (more…)

Radicchio

Radicchio

Radicchio, along with Belgian and curly endive, frisée, and escarole, are members of the leafy chicory family. Radicchio is characterized by variegated purplish-red leaves that can be a touch bitter and spicy, which is why it is generally used as a component, rather than the main ingredient, in most salads. (more…)

Fennel

Fennel

Fennel, also known as sweet fennel or finocchio, originated in the Mediterranean and is popular in Italian and Scandinavian cooking. Closely related to parsley, carrots, dill and coriander, this aromatic vegetable is the swollen, immature stem of a large, feathery bush. The young stems of the plant overlap at the base to form a bulb with white-to-pale-green ribbed layers. Although the stalks are similar to celery both in their appearance and in their crunchy texture, all parts of the plant (bulb, stalks, and fronds) have a pleasantly sweet anise, or licorice-like flavor, and are edible. (more…)

Sweet Potatoes

Sweet Potatoes

Sweet potatoes are native to Central and South America and are one of the oldest vegetables known to man.  They have been consumed since prehistoric times as evidenced by sweet potato relics dating back 10,000 years that have been discovered in Peruvian caves. (more…)

Romanesco Cauliflower

Romanesco Cauliflower

Romanesco cauliflower is a member of the Brassica family, which includes cabbage, Brussels sprouts, broccoli, and kale.  This unique cauliflower originated and was first identified in the 16th century in Italy. Sometimes called Romanesco broccoli, it looks nothing like broccoli and its flavor is much milder and sweeter than either broccoli or cauliflower. (more…)