Westfield Area CSA Blog

Hakurei turnips

Hakurei Salad Turnips

Hakurei turnips are a Japanese salad turnip.  They are sweet and much softer than a regular turnip, and rarely need to be peeled; just wash and trim the root ends.  The leaves are also edible but should be eaten within 1-2 days.  Wrapped tightly in plastic, the turnips can be stored in the refrigerator for up to 1 week. (more…)

Garlic Scapes

Garlic Scapes

For those of you familiar with the CSA, these curly beauties are a welcome friend.  For those new to the CSA experience, this may be one of your first “experimental” vegetables.

(more…)

Stir-Fried Garlic Lettuce

Stir-Fried Garlic Lettuce

Here’s an easy recipe that’s great if you have a head of lettuce that you have to use right away.  Even if you don’t, it’s still a delicious side dish to any Asian meal.  Simple to make, with common ingredients, it’s a keeper for sure.  Try different lettuce varieties.  Serves 4-6 as a side dish. (more…)

Baby Turnips and Turnip Greens

Baby Turnips and Turnip Greens

The following recipe, taken from the William Sonoma cookbook, Cooking from the Farmers’ Market, is a nice and easy way to use the turnips and its greens at once. As we expect the Hakurei to be small turnips, you can ignore the recommendation to trim the leaves in the recipe (below) but may follow it when using Fall turnips. The recipe yields 4 servings. Enjoy! (more…)

Circle Brook Farm

Farm News – June 10, 2019

Hello Everyone! So, we have arrived at the week many of you have been anxiously waiting for – the first CSA share delivery. In spite of the weather-related challenges we have faced this spring, we have a nice share for you to start out the season. (more…)

Kohlrabi

Kohlrabi

Kohlrabi is neither a root nor a leafy vegetable but a swollen stem (a member of the cabbage family) that grows perched on top of the ground.  This versatile veggie is underutilized in the U.S. but is common in Central Europe and Asia.  Some claim it tastes a little like a turnip, others like a cabbage. Not surprising since it was bred from a combination of the German “kohl” (cabbage) and “rabi” (turnip). It is an excellent source of potassium and vitamin C and also includes some calcium and vitamin A.  The taste and texture is similar to that of a broccoli stem, accented by radish, but is much sweeter and milder. (more…)