Category: Featured Produce

Potatoes

Potatoes

You may have noticed that the potatoes we get have had different hues of flesh.  Potatoes actually come in a rainbow of colors, from yellow “Yukon Gold” to “Purple Peruvian”.

Potatoes technically are not roots.  They are the swollen stems of rhizomes that we call tubers.  The “eyes” of the potato are actually growth points.  While potatoes have gotten a bad rap as carbohydrates, they are actually quite good for you.  A single medium sized potato contains about 3.6 grams of protein, 3.6 grams of dietary fiber, 36 grams of carbohydrates, and between 33-50% of RDA of Vitamin C. (more…)

Savoy cabbage

Cabbage

Cabbage is a leafy green or purple biennial plant, grown as an annual vegetable crop for its dense-leaved heads. Closely related to other cole crops, such as broccoli, cauliflower, and Brussels sprouts.  Smooth-leafed firm-headed green cabbages are the most common, with smooth-leafed red and crinkle-leafed savoy cabbages of both colors seen less frequently.  The cabbage heads are generally picked during the first year of the plants’ life cycles, but those intended for seed are allowed to grow a second year. (more…)

Cippolini Onions

Cippolini Onions

Cippolini (aka Cipolline) are small flat onions with a mild flavor. Their flat shape and size make them excellent candidates for roasting whole.

The biggest problem with these little gems is getting the skin off. Use a paring knife to cut strips of the skin from one end to another. Boiling briefly may also help to get the skins off.  But all that work is well worth it! (more…)

Spaghetti Squash

Spaghetti Squash

Spaghetti squash is an oblong yellow colored winter squash that is named for the spaghetti like nature of its flesh.  When raw, the flesh is hard and generally orange or yellow in color.  When cooked, it comes apart in ribbons, giving it the appearance of spaghetti. (more…)

Leeks

Leeks

Leeks, known scientifically as Allium porrum, are related to garlic, onions, shallots, and scallions. Leeks look like large scallions, having a very small bulb and a long white cylindrical stalk of tightly wrapped, layered leaves.  With a more delicate and sweeter flavor than onions, leeks add a subtle touch to recipes without overpowering the other flavors that are present. (more…)

Summer Savory

Summer Savory

Summer savory is commonly used as a flavoring for soups, stews, and marinades.  But it is also known as the “bean herb” because it goes so well with many types of beans, especially green beans or any other type of broad bean. It is also quite tasty in stuffings, with any type of meat or chicken, or sausages.  For a different use, try it in scrambled eggs or omelets. Add it to a salad dressing recipe for an aromatic flavor. (more…)

Peppers

Bell Peppers

Bell peppers belong to the nightshade (Solanaceae) family of plants, along with chili pepper, cayenne pepper, eggplant, tomatoes and potatoes (except sweet potatoes and yams).  Their scientific name is Capsicum annuum.  This scientific name, however, is used to refer not only to bell peppers, but also to wax peppers, cayenne peppers, chili peppers, and jalapeno peppers. (more…)

Tomatoes

Tomatoes

The tomato, like the eggplant, is a member of the Solanaceae, or Nightshade family.  Tomatoes are native to western South America, but were cultivated in Mexico by Mexican Indians, who were intrigued by its resemblance to the tomatillo – a staple in their cuisine.  With the discovery of the New World, tomato seeds were brought back to Spain, beginning the introduction of the fruit into Europe.  Tomatoes made their way to North America with the colonists who first settled in Virginia. (more…)

Green Beans

Beans

Green beans, also known as snap beans because they “snap” when broken, are harvested when young, when the beans inside the pod are small and tender and the pods are thin. They are very low in calories and loaded with vitamins K, A, and C, fiber, folate and anti-oxidants. Interestingly, green beans were originally cultivated in Peru and were then spread throughout Central and South America by Indian tribes. Spanish explorers brought them back from the “New World” to Europe in the 16th century, and from there they spread around the world. (more…)

Rainbow Carrots

Rainbow Carrots

Did you know that carrots are not originally orange?  That’s right.  The original carrot, which dates back more than 4.000 years to Afghanistan, was purple.  The orange carrot didn’t come into being until about 400 years ago, when Dutch farmers bred the carrot to be orange – their country’s color.  Today, carrots have been bred in a rainbow of colors, which makes them much more fun to eat, not to mention, more nutritious. (more…)