Category: Featured Produce

Romanesco Cauliflower

Romanesco Cauliflower

Romanesco cauliflower is a member of the Brassica family, which includes cabbage, Brussels sprouts, broccoli, and kale.  This unique cauliflower originated and was first identified in the 16th century in Italy. Sometimes called Romanesco broccoli, it looks nothing like broccoli and its flavor is much milder and sweeter than either broccoli or cauliflower. (more…)

Acorn Squash

Although considered a winter squash, acorn squash actually belongs to the same species as all “summer” squashes (such as zucchini and yellow squash).  The most common variety is dark green in color, but newer varieties can be yellow, white, even variegated.  As the name suggests, its shape resembles that of an acorn.  It is a good candidate for winter storage, keeping several months in a cool dry location.  Squash can be refrigerated, but it will deteriorate quickly and should only be refrigerated 1-2 weeks. (more…)

Butternut Squash

Butternut Squash

Butternut squash is a winter squash belonging to the Cucurbitaceae family of field pumpkins.  It has a sweet, nutty taste similar to that of a pumpkin.  It has tan-yellow skin and orange fleshy pulp with a compartment of seeds in the bottom.  When ripe, it turns increasingly deep orange, and becomes sweeter and richer. (more…)

Parsnips

Parsnips

The parsnip is a root vegetable related to the carrot, but white or cream colored and sweeter. Up until the potato arrived from the New World, its place in dishes was occupied by the parsnip and other root vegetables such as the turnip. (more…)

Potatoes

Potatoes

You may have noticed that the potatoes we get have had different hues of flesh.  Potatoes actually come in a rainbow of colors, from yellow “Yukon Gold” to “Purple Peruvian”.

Potatoes technically are not roots.  They are the swollen stems of rhizomes that we call tubers.  The “eyes” of the potato are actually growth points.  While potatoes have gotten a bad rap as carbohydrates, they are actually quite good for you.  A single medium sized potato contains about 3.6 grams of protein, 3.6 grams of dietary fiber, 36 grams of carbohydrates, and between 33-50% of RDA of Vitamin C. (more…)

celeriac

Celeriac

Celeriac, aka celery root or knob of celery, is a distinct variety from the plant that produces the green stalks we enjoy in salads and soups; is cultivated specifically for its large, robust, and unfortunately rather ugly root.  It is a distant cousin to anise, carrots, parsley and parsnips.  Celeriac is recognized for its large, round, knobby and deeply gnarled, root ball.

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Kohlrabi

Kohlrabi

Kohlrabi is neither a root nor a leafy vegetable but a swollen stem (a member of the cabbage family) that grows perched on top of the ground.  This versatile veggie is underutilized in the U.S. but is common in Central Europe and Asia.  Some claim it tastes a little like a turnip, others like a cabbage. Not surprising since it was bred from a combination of the German “kohl” (cabbage) and “rabi” (turnip). It is an excellent source of potassium and vitamin C and also includes some calcium and vitamin A.  The taste and texture is similar to that of a broccoli stem, accented by radish, but is much sweeter and milder. (more…)

Spaghetti Squash

Spaghetti Squash

Spaghetti squash is an oblong yellow colored winter squash that is named for the spaghetti like nature of its flesh.  When raw, the flesh is hard and generally orange or yellow in color.  When cooked, it comes apart in ribbons, giving it the appearance of spaghetti. (more…)

Okra

Okra

In the south, it’s available year-round, but for the rest of us, summer is a great time to take advantage of fresh okra. While it looks like a ridged pepper, okra belongs to the same family as hibiscus and cotton, and likely came to the U.S. from Africa more than three centuries ago. (more…)

Arugula

Arugula

If you ever see a salad green referred to as “rocket,” it’s simply another name for arugula, or roquette in French.  Yet another brassicaceae along with kale and cauliflower, its delightfully pungent leaves have been cultivated in the Mediterranean since time was recorded.  As such, arugula is a perennial favorite in Italian cooking. (more…)