Category: Featured Produce

Radishes

Radishes

Radishes are the root of a plant closely related to mustard (hence their bite).  They come in a variety of sizes, shapes and colors and are generally used as a garnish or salad ingredient because of their mild-to-peppery flavor.  When cooked, they have a delicate flavor similar to that of white salad turnips.  They can be cooked whole or thinly sliced, steamed with a bit of water (or vegetable stock) and butter.  I’ve even seen a recipe for glazed whole radishes with a bit of brown sugar and butter. (more…)

Kohlrabi

Kohlrabi

Kohlrabi is neither a root nor a leafy vegetable but a swollen stem (a member of the cabbage family) that grows perched on top of the ground.  This versatile veggie is underutilized in the U.S. but is common in Central Europe and Asia.  Some claim it tastes a little like a turnip, others like a cabbage. Not surprising since it was bred from a combination of the German “kohl” (cabbage) and “rabi” (turnip). It is an excellent source of potassium and vitamin C and also includes some calcium and vitamin A.  The taste and texture is similar to that of a broccoli stem, accented by radish, but is much sweeter and milder. (more…)

Winter Veggies

Protecting the Stock-Up

Now that you have your stock-up share, how do you keep it edible if you don’t want to refrigerate everything? If you don’t have a root cellar, and my guess is few of us have one, can you leave it all in the garage or is it safer in the basement? (more…)

Delicata Squash

Delicata Squash

Delicata squash is a long, oblong-shaped squash with a cream colored, green-striped, outer skin and a golden, fine-textured inner flesh.  This is one of the tastier winter squashes, with a creamy pulp that tastes a bit like corn and sweet potatoes.  It can be baked or steamed and served as a side dish, seasoned with butter and herbs, providing a sweet nutty flavor with a creamy smooth texture.  The thin skin is also edible. (more…)

celeriac

Celeriac

Celeriac, aka celery root or knob of celery, is a distinct variety from the plant that produces the green stalks we enjoy in salads and soups; is cultivated specifically for its large, robust, and unfortunately rather ugly root.  It is a distant cousin to anise, carrots, parsley and parsnips. Celeriac is recognized for its large, round, knobby and deeply gnarled, root ball.

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Broccoli Raab

Broccoli Raab

Commonly known in the United States as broccoli raab, it is truly a vegetable with many names around the world.  A few of the many names are raab, rabe, rapa, rapine, rappi, rappone, turnip broccoli, taitcat, Italian or Chinese broccoli, broccoli rape, or broccoli de rabe. (more…)

Hakurei turnips

Hakurei Salad Turnips

Hakurei turnips are a Japanese salad turnip. They are sweet and much softer than a regular turnip, and rarely need to be peeled; just wash and trim the root ends. The leaves are also edible but should be eaten within 1-2 days. Wrapped tightly in plastic, the turnips can be stored in the refrigerator for up to 1 week (but you will enjoy them more if you eat them right after the sugar snaps!). (more…)

Endive (aka Frisée)

Curly Endive (aka Frisée)

Curly endive, also known as frisée, is a leafy vegetable in the chicory family.  (Other chicory types include bitter veggies like escarole, radicchio, and the white-leaved Belgian endive).  Curly endive is a crisp bitter green can be used as an addition in salads, or can be cooked as a side dish.  The inner pale leaves are somewhat more tender and mild than the bitter outer ones.

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Lettuce

Lettuce

It is true, eating all that salad is good for you!  While the nutritional value of lettuce varies with the variety, the following excerpt from the University of Illinois website sets the record straight:  Lettuce in general provides small amounts of dietary fiber, some carbohydrates, a little protein and a trace of fat. Its most important nutrients are vitamin A and potassium.   (more…)

Leeks

Leeks

Leeks, known scientifically as Allium porrum, are related to garlic, onions, shallots, and scallions. Leeks look like large scallions, having a very small bulb and a long white cylindrical stalk of tightly wrapped, layered leaves.  With a more delicate and sweeter flavor than onions, leeks add a subtle touch to recipes without overpowering the other flavors that are present. (more…)