Category: Featured Produce

Butternut Squash

Butternut Squash

Butternut squash is a winter squash belonging to the Cucurbitaceae family of field pumpkins.  It has a sweet, nutty taste similar to that of a pumpkin.  It has tan-yellow skin and orange fleshy pulp with a compartment of seeds in the bottom.  When ripe, it turns increasingly deep orange, and becomes sweeter and richer. (more…)

Sweet Potatoes

Sweet Potatoes

Sweet potatoes are native to Central and South America and are one of the oldest vegetables known to man.  They have been consumed since prehistoric times as evidenced by sweet potato relics dating back 10,000 years that have been discovered in Peruvian caves.

Christopher Columbus brought sweet potatoes to Europe after his first voyage to the New World in 1492.  By the 16th century, they were brought to the Philippines by Spanish explorers and to Africa, India, Indonesia, and southern Asia by the Portuguese. Around this same time, sweet potatoes began to be cultivated in the southern United States, where they still remain a staple food in the traditional cuisine. (more…)

Acorn Squash

Although considered a winter squash, acorn squash actually belongs to the same species as all “summer” squashes (such as zucchini and yellow squash).  The most common variety is dark green in color, but newer varieties can be yellow, white, even variegated.  As the name suggests, its shape resembles that of an acorn.  It is a good candidate for winter storage, keeping several months in a cool dry location.  Squash can be refrigerated, but it will deteriorate quickly and should only be refrigerated 1-2 weeks. (more…)

Potatoes

Potatoes

You may have noticed that the potatoes we get have had different hues of flesh.  Potatoes actually come in a rainbow of colors, from yellow “Yukon Gold” to “Purple Peruvian”.

Potatoes technically are not roots.  They are the swollen stems of rhizomes that we call tubers.  The “eyes” of the potato are actually growth points.  While potatoes have gotten a bad rap as carbohydrates, they are actually quite good for you.  A single medium sized potato contains about 3.6 grams of protein, 3.6 grams of dietary fiber, 36 grams of carbohydrates, and between 33-50% of RDA of Vitamin C. (more…)

Spaghetti Squash

Spaghetti Squash

Spaghetti squash is an oblong yellow colored winter squash that is named for the spaghetti like nature of its flesh.  When raw, the flesh is hard and generally orange or yellow in color.  When cooked, it comes apart in ribbons, giving it the appearance of spaghetti. (more…)

Broccoli Raab

Broccoli Raab

Commonly known in the United States as broccoli raab, it is truly a vegetable with many names around the world.  A few of the many names are raab, rabe, rapa, rapine, rappi, rappone, turnip broccoli, taitcat, Italian or Chinese broccoli, broccoli rape, or broccoli de rabe. (more…)

Beets

Beets

Beets are filled with good things.  High in fiber, vitamins A and C, and surprisingly, more iron than most other vegetables, including spinach!  They also contain calcium, potassium, phosphorous, and folic acid.  The pigments that give beets their signature coloring are strong antioxidants. (more…)

Ground Cherries

Ground Cherries

Ground cherries  (aka goldenberries, husk tomatoes, or cape gooseberries) are one of the fun, unique items that you learn about when you join our CSA.  These small fruit are in the tomato family and have a paper wrapper similar to a tomatillo.  They are very sweet and have an interesting flavor, nutty and a bit of pineapple.  (more…)

Heirloom Vegetables

Heirloom Vegetables

Farmer John loves to experiment with heirloom vegetables and we get to enjoy the results!  But what exactly is an “heirloom” vegetable, and how does it differ from a “regular” vegetable? According to Wikipedia, “An heirloom vegetable is a cultivar that was commonly grown during earlier periods in human history, but which is not used in modern large-scale agriculture. Many heirloom vegetables have kept their traits through open pollination, while fruit varieties such as apples have been propagated over the centuries through grafts and cuttings.” (more…)

Okra

Okra

In the south, it’s available year-round, but for the rest of us, summer is a great time to take advantage of fresh okra. While it looks like a ridged pepper, okra belongs to the same family as hibiscus and cotton, and likely came to the U.S. from Africa more than three centuries ago. (more…)