Westfield Area CSA Blog

Kohlrabi Curry

Kohlrabi Curry

Kohlrabi is found in a lot of Indian cuisine, so it naturally goes well with traditional Indian spices.  You can substitute it for other vegetables like potato or eggplant.  This recipe was adapted from Eggplant Curry in the Moosewood Cookbook. (more…)

Circle Brook Farm

Farm News – June 13, 2016

Hello Everyone!  So we waited with a mixture of anticipation and dread for the severe storms predicted for Saturday.  We badly need the rain but worried about the high winds and potential for hail.  In the end we got no rain at all, only 2 days of high winds that have been wreaking havoc with our crop covers and drying out the soil even more.  There is some hope for precipitation at the end of the week; in the meantime, we will be moving the sprinklers around from field to field to keep the crops growing and the seeds germinating. (more…)

Broccoli Leaf Soup

Broccoli Leaf Soup

This is a simple soup that is simply good. The farina makes it creamy without the extra calories of cream. Make a large batch, and freeze the extra for another day! To make the soup even more healthy, replace the butter with olive oil. (more…)

Vegetable Stir Fry

Vegetable Stir Fry

If you’re ever unsure of what to do with your veggies, stir fries are a great way to combine just about anything into a delicious and fast meal.  Here’s a simple recipe using many Asian greens.  All measurements are approximate, and feel free to substitute! (more…)

Circle Brook Farm

Farm News – June 6, 2016

Hi Folks! We finally got some rain here at the farm on Sunday, just over an inch.  We need more but are grateful for what we receive.

We have essentially lost the first planting of arugula, broccoli raab, and tatsoi as a result of the dry conditions and the heat wave. It had been under siege from a pernicious pest – the flea beetle – and was covered with an Ag fabric to protect it.   (more…)

Sunchokes

Jerusalem Artichokes (aka Sunchokes)

Sunchokes, of the sunflower family, are native to North America where the natives called them “sun roots” before European settlers arrived. Samuel Champlain, a French explorer found them in Cape Cod in 1605 and pronounced them similar in taste to artichokes. But why “Jerusalem artichokes”? They don’t come from Jerusalem nor do they look like artichokes. There are a few theories: when first discovered people started calling them “girasole” (or flower that turns looking for the sun) which eventually became “Jerusalem”. Another possibility is that as sunchokes became the staple food of the first European pilgrims in North American soil they named it as food for the “new Jerusalem”. (more…)

Circle Brook Farm

Farm News – June 3, 2016

Hi Folks, Firstly, I would like to apologize for having been incommunicado until now.  I normally write one or two pre-season updates to keep members apprised of how things are going at the farm.  It has been an extra challenging spring this year, we once again got off to a late start owing to winter sticking around until Mid-April.  Since then it has been exceptionally dry despite a week of “rainy weather” which delivered barely a half an inch of drizzle during 6 days of gloomy overcast skies.  As always, my crew and I have been working hard to get the planting done and overcome the challenges.  (more…)