Monthly Archive: November 2015

Circle Brook Farm

Farm News – November 25, 2015

Hi Folks, A few words about the stock up share.  We ended up not having very much winter squash; it did not keep well for us this year. There is only acorn and some small buttercup. I recommend cooking the buttercup soon and freezing what you don’t need. The acorn should keep for a while but it does get stringy after many weeks in storage.

We have tried to make up for this with other items – notably sweet potatoes, which were not promised and have not been in the shares in years past.  We put them in plastic bags because they poke holes in paper ones, but they should be removed immediately and stored in paper bags or in a bowl on the counter.  It is better to keep these warm.   (more…)

Circle Brook Farm

Farm News – November 19, 2015

Hello Everyone!  So we have reached the end of the season and it is time for me to bid you all adieu until next year.  It was a challenging year, but with farming I have come to accept that each year will have its own unique problems and glitches.  It was, for the most part, a dry year, which is always better than a wet one.  We received just enough rain to get by, and irrigated when it began to get to dry.  Overall I am pleased with the production we had and with what I was able to provide to the members; I hope you all feel the same.  I feel we’ve been improving each year and will continue to strive to provide you and your family with the best variety and quality we can.  We have a very nice share for you this week, so we end the season on a high note. (more…)

Rutabagas

Rutabagas

Rutabagas are only called rutabagas in the U.S. Throughout the rest of the world, they’re known as swedes. This ordinary root vegetable is thought to have originated in Bohemia in the 17th century as a hybrid between the turnip and wild cabbage.

Members of the cabbage family, rutabagas are often confused with turnips, although there are noticeable differences. Rutabagas are larger, part white and part purple, with creamy orange flesh and ribs near the stem, and with a nutty, sweet flavor when roasted. Meanwhile, turnips are white with a purple-red top and a peppery taste. (more…)

Root Vegetable Gratin

Root Vegetable Gratin

This recipe, from Bon Appétit Magazine is a perfect way to use your fall root vegetables (feel free to substitute), and would make a great Thanksgiving dish.  Serves 8.

The key to gratins is having all the ingredients—whether they’re basic potatoes or the mixed root vegetables below—sliced the same thickness so they cook at the same rate. Make friends with a mandoline: It quickly yields precise, even slices. (more…)

Circle Brook Farm

Farm News – November 12, 2015

Hello Folks! As we head into the final weeks of the season we are becoming more dependent on roots and tubers to fill your basket. This week we will have carrots again, as well as beets, sunchokes, and salad turnips. The beet tops were damaged by the cold snap a few weeks back and so we will ship them loose without tops. The salad turnips still have beautiful greens, which, as always, I encourage you to eat. (more…)

Circle Brook Farm

Farm News – November 5, 2015

Hi Everyone, we had about 2 inches of much needed rain this past Wednesday. Although heavy at times it came over an extended period and so was mostly able to be soaked up by the soil. This should be a big help to the spinach and brassica plants as well as to our last planting of carrots. Temperatures remain balmy and this too will enable what is left in the field to continue growing and reach a respectable size. (more…)

Radicchio

Radicchio

Radicchio, along with Belgian and curly endive, frisée, and escarole, are members of the leafy chicory family. Radicchio is characterized by variegated purplish-red leaves that can be a touch bitter and spicy, which is why it is generally used as a component, rather than the main ingredient, in most salads. (more…)

Parsnips

Parsnips

The parsnip is a root vegetable related to the carrot, but white or cream colored and sweeter. Up until the potato arrived from the New World, its place in dishes was occupied by the parsnip and other root vegetables such as the turnip. (more…)