Monthly Archive: September 2017

Circle Brook Farm

Farm News – September 25, 2017

Hi Everyone!  As we head into the fall we will be transitioning back into cool weather crops, but for now we are still abundant with summer veggies.  Next week we will begin to have broccoli again and we will start to ship some of the winter squash in the shares.  We have a nice crop of fall carrots coming along, but we will give them one more week to size up.   We have salad turnips for everyone this week.  They are great either raw or cooked and have beautiful greens. (more…)

Circle Brook Farm

Farm News – September 18, 2017

Hi Folks!  So you might think that by now things would start to ease up a bit here on the farm, and I would have time to write these updates and get them out to the members in a timely manner.  But it never really slows down much until November.  We are still busy transplanting fall crops, such as lettuce, and direct seeding other crops like spinach and radish.  We are cleaning up fields that have produced their crop and planting oats and peas as a winter cover crop.  And we are preparing ground for planting garlic in late October and early November.  (more…)

Sautéed Hakurei Turnips With Turnip Greens

Sautéed Hakurei Turnips With Turnip Greens

Japanese baby turnips are tender, sweet, and juicy as can be.  By taking advantage of both their leaves and their bulbs, this easy and delicious recipe from seriouseats.com requires very few other ingredients, allowing the turnip flavor to shine through.  Because the cooking process is divided into two steps (blanching and sautéing), the turnip bulbs come out beautifully browned, while the greens stay plump and tender.  Serves 4 as a side dish. (more…)

Quick Kimchi

Quick Kimchi

This quick, spicy, tangy cabbage side dish stands in for the traditional salty Korean staple.  Unlike fermented kimchi, this quick variation is best eaten shortly after preparing and does not keep its crunchy texture when stored. Enjoy it with grilled meats or chicken.  The recipe makes 4 cups and is from Eating Well Magazine. (more…)

Southern-Style Green Beans

Southern-Style Green Beans

These Southern-style green beans, found on the Spicy Southern Kitchen food blog, are flavored with lots of bacon, and cooked long and slow until they’re melt-in-your-mouth tender. You’ll want to cook them for at least an hour, preferably closer to 2 hours, to get them really soft, but not mushy.  Just before serving, you can mix in a Tablespoon or so of butter to give the green beans a buttery coating.  Serves 6. (more…)

Circle Brook Farm

Farm News – September 11, 2017

Hello Everyone, we have another nice share for you this week, including another round of sweet corn.  Last week the corn we sent was Silverqueen, an old standard variety.  This week we are sending an heirloom variety called Luther Hill.  This is a variety that is well renowned in the tristate area, with its fans known for seeking it out.  It was actually one of the parents that were used in creating the hybrid Silverqueen.  It has rather small ears but boasts excellent flavor without the cloying sweetness of the new supersweet hybrids.  A few groups were shorted their Silverqueen last week and will receive it this time around and the Luther Hill for next week.  Everyone will receive some corn at least twice this season.  We have one more planting but it is uncertain how well it will yield.  There is a low incidence of earworm but it is still possible you may find one on the tip of some of your ears. (more…)

Circle Brook Farm

Farm News – September 4, 2017

Hi Folks, Happy Labor Day!  I hope you enjoyed it however you spent it!  Of course, there’s no day off for us here on the farm — the show must go on!  My workers don’t mind — they are here to work and earn money to help their families.  And I get my vacation time in the winter.  Speaking of winter… it feels like it will be here soon!  We have had a few very chilly nights up here in North Jersey.  The long range forecast doesn’t call for frost until sometime in Mid-October; I hope that will be the case.  The fall crops are loving it, and the warm weather crops are hanging in there (excepting the melons and tomatoes, which were done in by the rain). (more…)

Endive (aka Frisée)

Curly Endive (aka Frisée)

Curly endive, also known as frisée, is a leafy vegetable in the chicory family.  (Other chicory types include bitter veggies like escarole, radicchio, and the white-leaved Belgian endive).  Curly endive is a crisp bitter green can be used as an addition in salads, or can be cooked as a side dish.  The inner pale leaves are somewhat more tender and mild than the bitter outer ones.

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Frisée aux Lardons

Frisée aux Lardons

From the New York Times, here is a bistro salad classic of curly endive with bacon and poached egg.  You want curly endive with tender, blanched centers.  That means the darker green outer leaves must be removed and not used in the dish. You want to expose the pale inner leaves and keep them looking as natural as possible. Don’t chop them.  For the lardons, use bacon or, if you don’t want its smoky taste, unsmoked pancetta.  And when you fry them, take care to brown the lardons lightly so that they are crisp, but with a little give.  Don’t overcook them, or the egg. (more…)