Monthly Archive: October 2020

Circle Brook Farm

Farm News – October 26, 2020

Hello Everyone! The weather continues to be good for growing, although it looks like a dreary week ahead. The forecast for Friday night to Saturday has been fluctuating in the mid-twenties, what we’d refer to as a hard freeze as opposed to just a frost. At that point we will be giving up on protecting the more tender crops and covering the hardier ones to protect them from damage. Even crops like kale and spinach, which are quite tough, can sustain damage that reduces their quality and marketability. We will have to cut any broccoli or cauliflower that is heading regardless of the size, because if the heads freeze they are ruined. Lettuce is amazingly resistant to the cold, but if the tender center of the plant freezes it will no longer continue to grow and size up. There are only a few weeks until the end of the CSA season, but the challenges never end! (more…)

Arugula

Arugula

If you ever see a salad green referred to as “rocket,” it’s simply another name for arugula, or roquette in French. Yet another brassicaceae along with kale and cauliflower, its delightfully pungent leaves have been cultivated in the Mediterranean since time was recorded. As such, arugula is a perennial favorite in Italian cooking. (more…)

Bok Choy with Shiitakes and Oyster Sauce

Bok Choy with Shiitakes and Oyster Sauce

This recipe is from Mark Bittman who writes “The Minimalist” column in the New York Times.  If you do not have any dried shiitake mushrooms, so you can use fresh shiitake mushrooms.  Where the recipe calls for reserved mushroom water from the dried mushrooms, you can substitute chicken broth.  Yields 4 servings. (more…)

Circle Brook Farm

Farm News – October 19, 2020

Hi Folks! The weather continues to be reasonably good for the crops. We had almost two inches of rain and another ¾ inch on Friday. We had a light frost Sunday morning. We continue to cover the beans and a few other more delicate crops to protect them from cold nights. We are getting a good harvest from the beans now, so our efforts have paid off. (more…)

Winter Squash

Winter Squash

Winter squash is really a misnomer, as these delicious treats are grown in the summer. They are edible well into the winter, however, thanks to their ability to last for months in storage.  First, be sure to check for any soft spots. If there are any, cook that squash right away. Soft spots can easily be cut out and the rest of the squash is usually fine. (more…)

Buttercup Squash with Apples

Buttercup Squash with Apples

This recipe is from the Betty Crocker Cooking for Two cookbook and is a perfect pairing of fall crops.  Buttercup squash, like acorn squash, isn’t always easy to peel – this makes it a great squash for stuffing with other things.  With brown sugar and apples, this recipe makes for a sweet side dish.  Serves 2. (more…)

Roasted Winter Squash Seeds

Roasted Winter Squash Seeds

Pumpkins aren’t the only squash that yield tasty seeds for roasting!  Next time you prepare a winter squash (e.g. butternut or acorn squash), save the seeds and have yourself a nutritious little snack. (more…)

Red Wine Chicken Stew with Root Vegetables

Red Wine Chicken Stew with Root Vegetables

From the Winter 2009 issue of Edible Green Mountains, this recipe serves 6. While not for a speedy, weeknight meal, it is delicious and well-worth the effort. You can omit the chestnuts or purchase great ones from Sonoma in a glass jar this time of year (just open and quarter). Do try it for that cozy Fall or Wintry supper!

P.S. The wines evaporate so no worries serving to the entire family.
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