Author: Bryan Housel

Circle Brook Farm

Farm News – October 22, 2018

Hi Folks! So, it hasn’t been raining much lately and the sun has even been shining from time to time. The fields are beginning to dry out a bit, although we still have deep ruts in many of our farm lanes. The weather issue we have been dealing with lately is cold nights. We have had 3 light frosts so far but no hard freeze. We are covering some crops like the peppers to try and keep them coming a little longer. Between the cold and the shorter days, everything grows a lot slower. We are waiting for the cauliflower to head up and for the spinach to get big enough to cut. I mentioned parsnips in last week’s update but we will hold off on these until next week. For this week we have rainbow carrots for you. (more…)

Bok choy

Bok Choy

Bok Choy is technically a Chinese cabbage. But until you cook with bok choy, you cannot appreciate how special it is. It has a mellow taste compared to some of the other asian greens such as tatsoi. (more…)

Broccoli Cheese Soup

Broccoli Cheese Soup

My friend made this soup for me, and it was so good, I had to share. The quantities of ingredients are approximate, so use your judgement. (more…)

Circle Brook Farm

Farm News – October 15, 2018

Hi Folks! So it’s another gloomy day here on the farm. What happened to the sun! We narrowly missed a frost on Sunday morning, but more cold air is moving in and we will certainly be hit by Wednesday or Thursday. This will mean the end of the eggplant and soon the end of the peppers. We are trying to cover as much as we can to protect it but it depends on how low it goes as to whether we succeed. Most of the crops remaining in the field are hardy and are not hurt by frosts or light freezes. Let’s just hope the mercury doesn’t dip too low anytime soon. They say the parsnips get sweeter after a frost so I guess we can begin to harvest them for next week. (more…)

Sweet Dumpling Squash

Sweet Dumpling Squash

When you need a smaller alternative to a big winter squash, sweet dumpling squash is the answer. About the size of an extra large apple, this single-serving squash usually weighs under one pound apiece and is shaped like a miniature pumpkin due to the scalloped lobes that form the rind. The skin is often white with mottled yellow, orange, and/or green markings. Inside, the flesh is smooth, tender, and sweet, with a bright orange color. Like all winter squash, it’s a great source of vitamins A and C, beta-carotene, and fiber. (more…)

Circle Brook Farm

Farm News – October 8, 2018

Hello Everyone! So last week was forecast to be free of rain but they changed it at the last minute. I thought we might get a little light rain overnight, and it began to drizzle as I rushed to finish seeding some spinach. By the time I got back to the house and showered, it was raining harder than I think I have ever seen. We received over 3 inches in about 3 hours. The farm is a muddy mess again, and I’m still waiting to see where those spinach seeds ended up! (more…)

Sweet Potatoes

Sweet Potatoes

Sweet potatoes are native to Central and South America and are one of the oldest vegetables known to man.  They have been consumed since prehistoric times as evidenced by sweet potato relics dating back 10,000 years that have been discovered in Peruvian caves.

Christopher Columbus brought sweet potatoes to Europe after his first voyage to the New World in 1492.  By the 16th century, they were brought to the Philippines by Spanish explorers and to Africa, India, Indonesia, and southern Asia by the Portuguese. Around this same time, sweet potatoes began to be cultivated in the southern United States, where they still remain a staple food in the traditional cuisine. (more…)