Author: Bryan Housel

Circle Brook Farm

Farm News – October 15, 2018

Hi Folks! So it’s another gloomy day here on the farm. What happened to the sun! We narrowly missed a frost on Sunday morning, but more cold air is moving in and we will certainly be hit by Wednesday or Thursday. This will mean the end of the eggplant and soon the end of the peppers. We are trying to cover as much as we can to protect it but it depends on how low it goes as to whether we succeed. Most of the crops remaining in the field are hardy and are not hurt by frosts or light freezes. Let’s just hope the mercury doesn’t dip too low anytime soon. They say the parsnips get sweeter after a frost so I guess we can begin to harvest them for next week. (more…)

Sweet Dumpling Squash

Sweet Dumpling Squash

When you need a smaller alternative to a big winter squash, sweet dumpling squash is the answer. About the size of an extra large apple, this single-serving squash usually weighs under one pound apiece and is shaped like a miniature pumpkin due to the scalloped lobes that form the rind. The skin is often white with mottled yellow, orange, and/or green markings. Inside, the flesh is smooth, tender, and sweet, with a bright orange color. Like all winter squash, it’s a great source of vitamins A and C, beta-carotene, and fiber. (more…)

Circle Brook Farm

Farm News – October 8, 2018

Hello Everyone! So last week was forecast to be free of rain but they changed it at the last minute. I thought we might get a little light rain overnight, and it began to drizzle as I rushed to finish seeding some spinach. By the time I got back to the house and showered, it was raining harder than I think I have ever seen. We received over 3 inches in about 3 hours. The farm is a muddy mess again, and I’m still waiting to see where those spinach seeds ended up! (more…)

Sweet Potatoes

Sweet Potatoes

Sweet potatoes are native to Central and South America and are one of the oldest vegetables known to man.  They have been consumed since prehistoric times as evidenced by sweet potato relics dating back 10,000 years that have been discovered in Peruvian caves.

Christopher Columbus brought sweet potatoes to Europe after his first voyage to the New World in 1492.  By the 16th century, they were brought to the Philippines by Spanish explorers and to Africa, India, Indonesia, and southern Asia by the Portuguese. Around this same time, sweet potatoes began to be cultivated in the southern United States, where they still remain a staple food in the traditional cuisine. (more…)

Circle Brook Farm

Farm News – October 1, 2018

Hello Everyone, Thanks to all who have expressed condolences and support. I know I have rather gloomy and down lately; it’s been a tough year. Farming can be a frustrating endeavor since the principal factor in success or failure – the weather – is totally beyond one’s control. I like to give you all loads of nice produce, not excuses, and I think we did okay for the first 2/3 of the season. Now we are feeling the pinch of the problems that all the rain that began in August has caused. (more…)

Circle Brook Farm

Farm News – September 24, 2018

Hi Everyone, So I regret to report that things have gone from bad to sad here on the farm. Pedro Perez Hernandez of Guatemala fathered and, along with his wife Juana raised 13 beautiful children, seven of whom work on my crew. Don Pedro passed away this past Saturday. Early Sunday morning I brought 3 of his children to the airport so that they could return to be with their family and help their mother through this difficult time. The practice what is called a novena, a nine-day period of prayer and mourning, so they will return in a little over a week. (more…)

Glazed Carrots Marsala

Glazed Carrots Marsala

For a real treat of a side dish, try Glazed Carrots Marsala.  I first read about this flavor combination in Elizabeth David’s Italian Food.  As she suggests, they’re delicious served with lamb.  If you don’t have Marsala, sweet sherry is a fine substitute. (more…)

Circle Brook Farm

Farm News – September 17, 2018

Hi Folks – I apologize that last week’s update was so short and somewhat gloomy. I’m afraid that this week will be rather curt as well. I don’t feel comfortable griping about the weather, even in my half joking way when our neighbors to the south have been dealt such a severe blow (no pun intended). This week’s share will be a bit light. I was unable to plant any seed for most of August and many crops have succumbed to disease caused by damp conditions or just aren’t growing right due to lack of sunshine. (more…)